July 13, 2024

What to do in case of broken Dog nail?

If your dog has a broken nail, it’s important to address the injury promptly to prevent further damage. Here are some steps you can take to help your dog’s broken nail:

dogs broken nails

  1. Clean the wound: If the broken nail is bleeding, gently clean the wound with a mild soap and water to remove any dirt or debris. Avoid using hydrogen peroxide or other harsh cleaners, as these can cause further irritation.
  2. Apply pressure: If the nail is bleeding, apply gentle pressure to the wound using a clean cloth or tissue. This can help stop the bleeding.
  3. Protect the nail: If the broken nail is still attached, wrap it in a bandage to protect it from further injury. Be sure to leave the bandage loose enough to allow for swelling.
  4. Keep an eye on the wound: Monitor the wound closely over the next few days to ensure that it is healing properly. If the nail becomes infected or if your dog is in pain, contact your veterinarian for further treatment.
  5. Trim the nail: Once the nail has healed, you may need to trim it to prevent it from breaking again. If you’re not comfortable doing this yourself, ask your veterinarian or a groomer to do it for you.

By following these steps, you can help your dog’s broken nail heal properly and prevent further injuries. Remember, if your dog is in severe pain or if the nail is severely damaged, it’s important to contact your veterinarian for further treatment.

Why Do Dog Nails Break?

There are a few possible reasons why a dog’s nails might break:

  1. Overgrown nails: If a dog’s nails are allowed to grow too long, they can become brittle and prone to breaking.
  2. Trauma: A dog’s nails can break if they hit them on a hard surface, such as a pavement or a piece of furniture.
  3. Degenerative joint disease: Dogs with degenerative joint disease (DJD) may have weak nails that are prone to breaking. DJD is a common condition in older dogs and can cause pain and difficulty moving.
  4. Nutrient deficiencies: A lack of certain nutrients, such as protein, zinc, and fatty acids, can cause a dog’s nails to become brittle and prone to breaking.
  5. Genetic predisposition: Some dogs may be more prone to brittle nails due to genetics.

If your dog’s nails are frequently breaking, it’s important to identify the cause and take steps to prevent further injuries. Working with your veterinarian or a qualified dog behaviorist can help you determine the cause of your dog’s brittle nails and provide guidance on how to address the issue.

Why Dog’s Broken Nails a Problem?

A broken nail can be a problem for a dog for several reasons. Here are a few:

  1. Pain: A broken nail can be painful for a dog, especially if the nail is broken close to the quick (the sensitive area that contains blood vessels and nerves).
  2. Bleeding: A broken nail that is broken close to the quick can result in bleeding. This can be painful for the dog and may require medical attention to stop the bleeding and prevent infection.
  3. Infection: If a broken nail is not treated properly, it can become infected. This can lead to further pain and discomfort for the dog and may require treatment with antibiotics.
  4. Difficulty walking: If a dog’s nail is broken and not properly treated, it may cause the dog difficulty walking or moving around. This can be especially problematic for dogs that are active and need to be able to move around freely.

What to do if Dog broke nail and its quick is exposed?

If your dog’s nail is broken and the quick (the sensitive area that contains blood vessels and nerves) is exposed, it’s important to take immediate action to stop the bleeding and prevent infection. Here’s what you can do:

  1. Apply direct pressure to the nail: Use a clean cloth or gauze to apply direct pressure to the nail to stop the bleeding.
  2. Clean the wound: If the nail is visibly dirty, gently clean the wound with a mild soap and warm water. Avoid using hydrogen peroxide or alcohol, as these can irritate the wound and cause further pain.
  3. Trim the remaining nail: Use a nail clipper to carefully trim the remaining nail so it is even with the quick. Avoid cutting the quick, as this can cause further bleeding and pain.
  4. Bandage the wound: If the nail is still bleeding or the quick is exposed, you may need to wrap the nail in a clean bandage to protect the wound and keep it clean.
  5. Monitor the wound: Keep an eye on the wound for any signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, or discharge. If you notice any of these signs, or if the wound does not seem to be healing properly, it’s important to seek veterinary attention as soon as possible.

It’s important to remember that broken nails can be painful for dogs and may require medical attention to properly heal. If you are unsure about how to care for a broken nail or if your dog is in a lot of pain, it’s best to consult with a veterinarian for proper treatment.

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